AIRE: Atmospheric Information Resource for Educators and students

Cómo acceder al sitio web de la EPA en Español hoy en dia

Presidente Trump ha prohibido a los empleados de la Agencia de Protección Ambiental (EPA) comunicarse con el público. También exige que la Agencia elimine toda la información sobre el clima y el cambio climático de su sitio web.

Ud. tiene el derecho de saber:

  • – Información sobre el medio ambiente y cómo afecta su salud
  • – Información sobre el cambio climático
  • – Los resultados de las investigaciónes que se financian con los dólares de sus impuestos

Científicos y ambientalistas estan trabajando para preservar al contenido del sitio web de la EPA. Ud. puede acceder a todo el sitio de la EPA en español entero, incluyendo el material sobre el clima, a través del Internet Archive, aquí:

EPA report “Climate Change Indicators of the United States 2016” available here

We’re posting the publicly available 2016 report of the U.S. EPA, Climate Change Indicators in the United States, on this page. This is the fourth edition of this technical report, and has been a frequently used and well-loved resource among scientists and educators.

The files were downloaded from on January 24, 2017

New Report: The Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research

CrDKHW6XYAIeMWo (1)The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine released a new report this week on the Future of Atmospheric Chemistry Research. The report was prepared by an expert panel of atmospheric chemists which convened several times throughout the past year and solicited input from the broader research community.  The report presents a retrospective of the successes of atmospheric chemistry research to date, and a vision for coming decades. Priority areas include: developing tools such as new laboratory and analytical instrumentation to accomplish scientific goals, creating data archiving systems, and improving opportunities for interdisciplinary work.


Happy New Year from AIRE!: Fireworks and Air Pollution

Diwali Fireworks, Melbourne, Australia (wikimedia commons)
Diwali Fireworks, Melbourne, Australia (wikimedia commons)

We here at AIRE wish you a happy and healthy 2016!  The new year is greeted in many parts of the world with fireworks: both large, spectacular shows and on smaller scales at home, on the beach, in the street, etc.  While they are beautiful and festive, fireworks often have a major negative impact on air quality. Concentrations of fine particulate matter skyrocket during and after holidays such as New Year’s, Diwali, or the 4th of July in the US where fireworks displays are prevalent.  The particles generated often contain elevated levels of toxic chemical components such as metals (the same ingredients that give the fireworks their impressive colors).

Fireworks are not a regulated source of air pollution since they only impact air quality a few nights a year in most places.  However, sensitive populations including asthmatics may want to think twice about breathing the smoke created on those festive nights (or at least carry your inhaler when heading out to that New Year’s Eve party!).

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