AIRE: Atmospheric Information Resource for Educators and students

New ACS Policy Statement on Climate Change

The American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific organization, has renewed its policy statement on climate change for 2016-2019. Highlights include:

  • – A strong, clear message: “The American Chemical Society (ACS) acknowledges that climate change is real, is serious and has been influenced by anthropogenic activity.”
  • – Recommendations for how U.S. Government may take leadership in efforts to combat climate change
  •  – Links to valuable resources from, for example, the National Academies, the US Global Climate Change Resource Program, and the IPCC

 

Cómo acceder al sitio web de la EPA en Español hoy en dia

Presidente Trump ha prohibido a los empleados de la Agencia de Protección Ambiental (EPA) comunicarse con el público. También exige que la Agencia elimine toda la información sobre el clima y el cambio climático de su sitio web.

Ud. tiene el derecho de saber:

  • – Información sobre el medio ambiente y cómo afecta su salud
  • – Información sobre el cambio climático
  • – Los resultados de las investigaciónes que se financian con los dólares de sus impuestos

Científicos y ambientalistas estan trabajando para preservar al contenido del sitio web de la EPA. Ud. puede acceder a todo el sitio de la EPA en español entero, incluyendo el material sobre el clima, a través del Internet Archive, aquí:

https://web.archive.org/web/20170125080600/https://espanol.epa.gov/

Live reporting from Beijing: Air Quality in Crisis

V. Faye McNeill, Beijing, China, December 21, 2016

Haze over central Beijing, 12/20/2016. Photo credit: V. F. McNeill

Much of China, including the capital city, Beijing, is experiencing sustained heavy smog this week, with air pollution at hazardous levels for the past three days. Concentrations of fine particulate matter in Beijing’s air today exceeded 400 ug/m3, more than ten times China’s National Ambient Air Quality Standard (35 ug/m3). The episode has caused an increase in hospitalizations and disruptions in air traffic due to poor visibility. The government has declared a “red alert” and taken emergency measures including industrial shutdowns, odd-even traffic restrictions, and school cancellations to protect public health.

“I love Beijing.  I grew up here and spent my whole life here.  If it weren’t for the air pollution, I would love living here.  But now I think about leaving. Many people are leaving.”

Reduced visibility at Beijing’s airport. 12/20/2016 Photo credit: V.F. McNeill

Air quality is an ongoing issue in Beijing, and a major subject of concern for its residents. As one Beijing native told me: “I love Beijing.  I grew up here and spent my whole life here.  If it weren’t for the air pollution, I would love living here.  But now I think about leaving. Many people are leaving.” According to the U.S. Embassy, between 2008-2015, the daily average air quality index in Beijing fell in the “Unhealthy,” “Very Unhealthy,” or “Hazardous” categories 67% of the time. A severe air quality episode in January 2013 was somewhat of a turning point, leading to increased pressure on the government to tighten regulations. One outcome was the amendment of the national ambient air quality standards. Meeting the new standards for PM2.5 would be a major step towards protecting public health. But, as episodes like this one show, improvement is slow to come. Plans for local implementation and enforcement of the new air quality standards are still in the development stages. In some cases major changes in infrastructure are needed in order to reduce emissions, and this can take time. Local efforts alone won’t be enough: The city of Beijing has made bold moves towards eliminating coal burning within the city, but much of Beijing’s pollution comes from upwind sources, outside the city limits.

With the will of government and the people aligned, China is poised to turn around its air pollution problem. Unlike the U.S., which greatly improved its air quality in the last century and now must tackle climate, China is in a position to develop smart new policies and technology to improve air quality and reduce carbon emissions simultaneously.

Recommended Resource: Moms Clean Air Force

Moms Clean Air Force is an organization of families fighting against environmental pollution.  Their website is full of excellent resources, with information on such topics as indoor air pollution, fracking, smog, and more. Our favorite feature is the “mom detective.” They have a very active and interesting twitter feed at @CleanAirMoms. Moms Clean Air Force is sponsored by the Environmental Defense Fund.

http://www.momscleanairforce.org/

Recurso Recomendado: @MamasAireLimpio

Moms Clean Air Force es una comunidad de familias unidas contra la contaminación  del medio ambiente.  Su sito del web (enlace por debajo) es muy informativo y interesante, con muchos recursos en español sobre temas incluso: contaminación del aire en interiores, la fractura hidráulica (fracking), y el smog.  Siguelos por twitter: @mamasairelimpio

Moms Clean Air Force es un proyecto del Environmental Defense Fund.

¡Bienvenidos a Moms Clean Air Force!

Go to S’COOL with NASA #SkyScience!

Haga click aquí para ver esta publicada en Español

Next week (Oct. 12-14) is Earth Sciences Week.  This is a great opportunity to get to know the educational programs offered by NASA.  Our favorite is “S’COOL.”  In this program, you learn about the different types of clouds, and you can make observations of the clouds in your area, record them, and report them back to NASA.  By doing this, you can help NASA validate the performance of the CERES satellite.  This satellite observes the same clouds you see from the ground, but from space!

Get to know the different types of clouds:  Cloud Identification Chart (NASA)

Record your observations: Report Form

Report them to NASA: S’COOL Ground Observation Report

Vete pa’ S’COOL con NASA #SkyScience

La próxima semana (Oct. 12-14) es la Semana de las Ciencias de la Tierra.  Es una gran oportunidad para conocer los programas educativos ofrecidos por la NASA.  Nuestro programa favorito es “S’COOL.”  En este programa, se aprende sobre los diferentes tipos de nubes, y  se pueden hacer observaciones de las mismas en su área, registrarlas, y reportarlas a la NASA.  De esta manera, se puede ayudar a la NASA a verificar la funcionalidad del satélite CERES.  Este satélite observa las mismas nubes que se pueden ver desde el puto de vista terrestre, al igual que desde el espacio!

Conoce los tipos de nubes:  Carta de Identificación de Nubes (NASA)

Registra tus observaciones: Forma de Reporte

Reportarlas a la NASA: Reporte de Observaciones Terrestres de S’COOL

UN Women/Mary Robinson Foundation Climate Event

Prof. McNeill attended an event titled “Leaders’ Forum on Women Leading the Way- Raising Ambition for Climate Action” on Monday Sep. 22.  The event was hosted by UN Women and the Mary Robinson Foundation – Climate Justice in conjunction with the UN Climate Summit 2014.

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